focused

Pittsburgh employment lawyer Charles A. Lamberton.

Representing executives, managers and professional

employees in discrimination, retaliation, sexual harassment

and wrongful termination cases for 20 years. High quality

representation for high end cases and clients.

412-258-2250 or cal@lambertonlaw.com

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LAMBERTON LAW FIRM, LLC
707 GRANT STREET
1705 GULF TOWER
PITTSBURGH, PA 15219

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CAL@LAMBERTONLAW.COM


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Recent Posts
  • Nov 7 2017 - EEOC’s Public Portal online now

    Today the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) launched an EEOC Public Portal to provide online access to individuals inquiring about discrimination.

    “This secure online system makes the EEOC and an individual’s charge information available wherever and whenever it is most … Continue reading

  • Oct 28 2017 - What to do about sexual harassment at work

    Contact legal counsel immediately.  Call us at 412-258-2250 or email us at cal@lambertonlaw.com.

    Check to see if your employer has an anti-harassment policy. This may be on the employer’s website. If it’s not, check your employee handbook. Finally, you can ask … Continue reading

  • Oct 25 2017 - What to do when you’re terminated

    Verify the reason for your termination
    If you were fired, attempt to obtain a written statement of the reason(s) for your termination. If you cannot obtain a statement in writing ask your supervisor or manger to tell you the reason. Then … Continue reading

  • Sep 18 2017 - Equifax proves case against forced arbitration

    By David Dayen, The Intercept – EQUIFAX, THE CREDIT REPORTING BUREAU that on Thursday admitted one of the largest data breaches in history, affecting 143 million U.S. consumers, is maneuvering to prevent victims from banding together to sue the company, … Continue reading

  • Aug 24 2017 - Court finds employer’s business judgment is BS

    The so-called “business judgment” rule is subject to the “BS” rule; if the facts show that the employer’s business judgment isn’t credible, the claims will go to trial. A recent example comes from a New York federal court in Roa v. … Continue reading

  • Jul 26 2017 - Why Trump is wrong about transgenders serving in the military

    If their heart calls them to service, if they are prepared to fight, bleed and die for the Country, their Country should welcome their service and praise their patriotism. It’s that simple. Donald Trump is the last person on Earth … Continue reading

  • Jul 13 2017 - IBM collective action waivers and private arbitration

    Is IBM ingenious or has it shot itself in the head? Time and the Supreme Court will soon tell. As those following IBM’s force reductions over the last few years already know, IBM stopped asking its terminated older workers for … Continue reading

  • May 20 2017 - Racism, American style

    Slavery was brought to North America in the 1600s, where it took hold in colonies established by white Europeans who relied for money on the sale of tobacco and cotton. White plantation owners prospered on the backs of slave laborers. … Continue reading

  • May 10 2017 - Donald Trump, the FBI and pretext

    President Donald Trump’s recent termination of FBI Director James Comey belongs in a textbook on employment discrimination. It shows the way employers can get into legal trouble when firing an employee. It is such a textbook example of a “bad … Continue reading

  • Mar 27 2017 - Ageism is all around us

    We cannot forget that ageism is the most socially condoned form of discrimination in the United States. This clip from SNL reminds us of some common ageist stereotypes. Carvey’s character is called “Grumpy Old Man.” Grumpiness would be the first … Continue reading


Today the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) launched an EEOC Public Portal to provide online access to individuals inquiring about discrimination.

“This secure online system makes the EEOC and an individual’s charge information available wherever and whenever it is most convenient for that individual,” said EEOC Acting Chair Victoria A. Lipnic. “It’s a giant leap forward for the EEOC in providing online services.”

The EEOC Public Portal allows individuals to submit online initial inquiries and requests for intake interviews with the agency. Initial inquiries and intake interviews are typically the first steps for individuals seeking to file a charge of discrimination with EEOC. In fiscal year 2017, the EEOC responded to over 550,000 calls to the toll-free number and more than 140,600 inquiries in field offices, reflecting the significant public demand for EEOC’s services. Handling this volume of contacts through an online system is more efficient for the public and the agency as it reduces the time and expense of paper submissions.

The new system enables individuals to digitally sign and file a charge prepared by the EEOC for them. Once an individual files a charge, he or she can use the EEOC Public Portal to provide and update contact information, agree to mediate the charge, upload documents to his or her charge file, receive documents and messages related to the charge from the agency and check on the status of his or her charge. These features are available for newly filed charges and charges that were filed on or after Jan. 1, 2016 that are in investigation or mediation.

Five EEOC offices (CharlotteChicagoNew OrleansPhoenix and Seattle) piloted the new system for six months. Feedback from the public and the EEOC pilot offices led to improvements in the system for this nationwide launch.

The new system does not permit individuals to file charges of discrimination online that have not been prepared by the EEOC or to file complaints of discrimination against federal agencies.

In the next few weeks, the EEOC will also provide online access to charging parties for whom the agency has an email address, who have pending charges that are currently in investigation or mediation and were filed as of Jan. 1, 2016.

Individuals who do not have online access can call 1-800-669-4000 to get basic information about how to submit an inquiry to their local EEOC office.