6 Signs You’re Facing Age Discrimination in the Workplace

Age discrimination is a real problem for many older individuals in the workforce. It seems counterintuitive to ostracize populations with more experience and knowledge, but managers and hiring departments with ageist attitudes fail to recognize the value that older workers bring.It is estimated that about two-thirds of workers between the ages of 45 and 74 have experienced or witnessed age discrimination. It continues to be one of the more pervasive forms of discrimination seen by employment lawyers. For people within this age bracket, discriminatory attitudes and practices can be a top obstacle to obtaining employment.What is Age Discrimination?Age discrimination involves unfair or unfavorable treatment because of an employee’s age. It can occur in many forms, both subtle and blatant. Ageism can also combine with other types of discriminatory practices, including race-related and gender discrimination. For example, women and people of color often report that their age has more of a negative effect in their workplace.Age discrimination is illegal during any part of the employment process, from hiring to firing and every step in between. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) prohibits age discrimination against people aged 40 and over. As with most laws, there are special conditions and exceptions...

You’ve Been Terminated. Now What?

It's estimated that two million employees are fired from their jobs every year. You're likely feeling pretty emotional if you've just been fired, especially if you have bills to pay and a family to support. It might come as a shock to your system if it is unexpected.However, even if you thought it would happen soon, you might have been feeling dread for quite a while before getting fired.Or maybe you feel relieved because your job wasn't working out anymore. Whatever your reaction, you might not know where to turn.This can be confusing or stressful, especially if you feel you've been wronged by your employer.In this article, we'll review everything you should do after getting fired. The goal is to help you take all the proper steps, get what's due to you, and get you on your way to finding another job. Read on to learn more.Ask the Right QuestionsOnce you've processed the first emotions that come up after having been fired, you should use this experience as an opportunity to ask the right questions. First, you should ask your employer why they've fired you. This can be helpful for three reasons.First, it can be helpful to get honest feedback....

What is employment law?

What is Employment Law?Employment law regulates employers’ treatment of employees.It says that employers can’t discriminate against employees because of race, gender, pregnancy, national origin, age, religion or disability. It says that supervisors cannot sexually harass women at work. It says that employers must afford reasonable accommodations to qualified persons with physical or mental impairments. And it says that employers cannot retaliate against anyone for complaining about discrimination or standing up against discrimination or harassment at work. Employment law, in essence, is the law that imports our basic civil rights as Americans into our capitalist, corporate economy.Where would we be without the great civil rights laws? We’d be in a country like Russia, where employers can sexually harass employees with impunity, fire someone when he turns 50, refuse to hire someone in a wheelchair, or punish someone for opposing discrimination at work.Employment law broadly encompasses the areas of sexual harassment, gender discrimination, sex discrimination, pregnancy discrimination, race discrimination, disability discrimination, religious discrimination, age discrimination, medical leave, FMLA leave, status-based negative stereotypes, and retaliation. The employment laws create important rights that can be enforced in court and provide remedies such as damages for lost wages and benefits, emotional distress, attorney fees and...