Top Female Players Accuse U.S. Soccer of Wage Discrimination (New York Times)

A compelling piece from Andrew Das of the New York Times.  U.S. Soccer, the governing body for the sport in America, pays the members of the men’s and women’s national team who represent the United States in international competitions. The men’s team has historically been mediocre. The women’s team has been a quadrennial phenomenon, winning world and Olympic championships and bringing much of the country to a standstill in the process.Citing this disparity, as well as rising revenue numbers, five players on the women’s team filed a federal complaint Wednesday, accusing U.S. Soccer of wage discrimination because, they said, they earned as little as 40 percent of what players on the United States men’s national team earned even as they marched to the team’s third world championship last year. The five players, some of the most prominent women’s athletes in sports, said they were shortchanged on everything from bonuses to appearance fees to per diems.The case, submitted to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the federal agency that enforces civil rights laws against workplace discrimination, is the latest front in the spreading debate over equal treatment of female athletes. A tennis tournament director was forced to resign recently after saying that...

Toomey filibusters Womens’ Paycheck Fairness Act

To the Women of the great Commonwealth of Pennsylvania: My name is Patrick Toomey and I am your United States Senator from the Tea Party wing of the Republican Party. Here I am in my best charcoal gray and red tie. I am pointing because I am a serious man, and behind me is the Flag of our Nation. I believe in the Flag and the Constitution it represents.Perhaps I should qualify that. You see, while I am generally a serious man, I am not serious about pay equality for women. And while I believe in the Constitution, I am not a big fan of the Equal Protection clause. That's why on Wednesday, I joined my fellow Senate Republicans and unanimously voted against advancing the Paycheck Fairness Act.All Senate Democrats voted in favor of the bill, but they are Democrats and my job is to block whatever they try to do, at all costs.The bill I filibustered would have banned the practice of salary secrecy for all workers, about half of whom are either forbidden or strongly discouraged from discussing their pay with coworkers. For the general workforce, women who work full-time, year-round make 77 percent of what the same men make. The bill would also have...

Gender pay gap persits

When the Equal Pay Act became law in 1963, women were earning 59 cents on the dollar compared to men. Today, while women hold nearly half of all jobs, and generate a significant portion of the income that sustains their families, they still face a gap in pay compared to men's wages for similar work. Even now, women earn about 81 cents on the dollar compared to men — a gap that results in hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost wages. For African-American women and Latinas, the pay gap is even greater. For more on Equal Pay, including tools, resources and recently announced Apps, see below:A Guide to Women's Equal Pay Rights (PDF)English | French | Spanish | Chinese | VietnameseAn Employer's Guide to Equal Pay (PDF)English | French | Spanish | Chinese | VietnameseEqual Pay Enforcement Fact Sheet (PDF)White House Equal Pay PortalEqual Pay Task Force Report — June 2013 (PDF)DOL Working For Women AccomplishmentsHighlights of Women's Earnings by RegionAdvancing Equal Pay Enforcement: More Effective and Transparent Procedures for Investigating Pay DiscriminationWhite House Equal Pay Task Force Accomplishments Report: Fighting for Fair Pay in the Workplace (PDF)White House Facts About Equal PayPresidential Proclamation on Equal Pay DayThe Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, the very first bill President Obama signed into lawEqual Pay App Challenge winners