7 Signs You Are Being Sexually Harassed at Work

Sexual harassment is a serious issue in the workplace, with anywhere from 25-85% of women alone reporting experience with it. It can affect men and women of any age, race, or sexual orientation.If you are a victim of sexual harassment at work, it can be challenging to know what to do, especially if you fear it may impact your employment. Many people are not sure what counts as sexual harassment, so they may not know if they are victims of harassment, not to mention whether they should report it or not.This blog post will discuss seven signs that you are being sexually harassed at work and what to do if you see these behaviors happening in your place of employment.If you think you're a victim of sexual harassment, legal action is an option. Keep reading to gain a better understanding of what sexual harassment is.What Is Sexual Harassment?Sexual harassment is any unwelcome sexual advance, comment, question or physical contact. Sometimes it is perpetrated by a supervisor or manager, and sometimes by a coworker. Sexual harassment can occur through unwelcome physical touching, text messages, emails or verbal comments. Sexual harassment can have a devastating effect on mental health. It can cause...

What is employment law?

What is Employment Law?Employment law regulates employers’ treatment of employees.It says that employers can’t discriminate against employees because of race, gender, pregnancy, national origin, age, religion or disability. It says that supervisors cannot sexually harass women at work. It says that employers must afford reasonable accommodations to qualified persons with physical or mental impairments. And it says that employers cannot retaliate against anyone for complaining about discrimination or standing up against discrimination or harassment at work. Employment law, in essence, is the law that imports our basic civil rights as Americans into our capitalist, corporate economy.Where would we be without the great civil rights laws? We’d be in a country like Russia, where employers can sexually harass employees with impunity, fire someone when he turns 50, refuse to hire someone in a wheelchair, or punish someone for opposing discrimination at work.Employment law broadly encompasses the areas of sexual harassment, gender discrimination, sex discrimination, pregnancy discrimination, race discrimination, disability discrimination, religious discrimination, age discrimination, medical leave, FMLA leave, status-based negative stereotypes, and retaliation. The employment laws create important rights that can be enforced in court and provide remedies such as damages for lost wages and benefits, emotional distress, attorney fees and...

Harassers Flying Under the Radar: What is Considered Sexual Harassment at Work?

Workplace Sexual HarassmentUntil very recently, sexual harassment  in the workplace was tolerated, joked about, and simply accepted. The term “sexual harassment” was not created until the mid-1970s. It did not become part of the Civil Rights Act until 1980 when new guidelines were added.Employers must now adhere to laws that protect employees against sexual harassment and that provide remedies to sexual harassment victims.Despite these advances, sexual harassment often overlooked or disregarded in the workplace. In 2020 there were 11,497 sexual harassment allegations filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Males filed 16.8% of those complaints.The First Sexual Harassment CaseThe first sexual harassment case to come before the U.S. Supreme Court was Meritor Savings Bank v. Vinson in 1986. Michelle Vinson was a bank teller. Her claim focused on her boss pressuring her into a sexual relationship.The lawsuit alleged that the boss regularly fondled the plaintiff and other female employees. The lawsuit alleged that the sexual harassment created a hostile work environment. Unwelcome or unsolicited sexual advances can give rise to a hostile environment claim claim.Sexual Harassment in the WorkplaceAnyone who sexually harasses another person at work has violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sexual harassment...