More on unpaid internships

   The Post-Gazette's Michelle Hackeman interviewed us for this wonderful piece on unpaid internships and the Fair Labor Standard Act.  As Michelle reports, college students seek internships to gain job experience and learn what cannot be learned in a classroom.  That experience is supposed to give them a leg up on their competitors when they graduate and are applying for jobs.  But what happens when employers hire interns for no pay and then assign them menial work?  The employer gains an unfair advantage over its competitors and swindles the student interns who choose to invest in their future careers by working without pay in the short term.  Such conduct has broad repercussions, as Michelle reports in her article.Many students debate the value of unpaid internships - By Michelle Hackeman / Pittsburgh Post-GazetteUp until her junior year at Chatham University, Elizabeth Dorssom supplemented the hours she poured into her schoolwork with a job at a Bath & Body Works store. She would need the extra money: In May 2012, she graduated with $40,000 in student loan debt.Ms. Dorssom knew, like many of her college-age peers, that a bachelor's degree would not be her ticket to securing a job. So in her junior year, she quit...

CNBC Special Report, Charles Lamberton discusses paid sick leave

In this CNBC Special Report, I discuss the lack of paid sick leave in the United States with CNBC's Mark Koba.  The United States is the only advanced Country on Earth that does guarantee some form of paid sick leave for employees when they are sick or injured.  The absence of paid sick leave hits low income earners especially hard.  It also causes many people to report to work sick rather than stay home and recuperate from their illness. Click the image to read the full article.

They violated the Hatch Act

That's what we told Connor Adams Sheets of the International Business Times who interviewed us for his recent exclusive report on the politically charged, anti-Obama, anti-Democrat emails exchanged among several federal employees during work hours and using federal computer systems.  As Connor reported today:A group of employees at Cincinnati’s beleaguered Internal Revenue Service field office used IRS computers and email accounts to exchange dozens of emails during the months leading up to the 2008 presidential election among a group of friends and colleagues dubbed the "Neanderthals," discussing national politics in a manner that two employment lawyers say likely violated federal law.And certain decisions about who to promote within the office were decided in part based on considerations of employees’ political leanings, according to a longtime Cincinnati IRS field-office employee who declined to be identified but provided the internal emails to International Business Times.The 80 politically charged emails were sent among members of a group of more than 20 people, including at least eight employees of the Cincinnati IRS field office’s Employee Plans Office, part of the Tax Exempt & Government Entities Division there, which is already embroiled in a national scandal over its targeting of conservative groups for added scrutiny in the run-up to the 2012...