What is employment law?

What is Employment Law?Employment law regulates employers’ treatment of employees.It says that employers can’t discriminate against employees because of race, gender, pregnancy, national origin, age, religion or disability. It says that supervisors cannot sexually harass women at work. It says that employers must afford reasonable accommodations to qualified persons with physical or mental impairments. And it says that employers cannot retaliate against anyone for complaining about discrimination or standing up against discrimination or harassment at work. Employment law, in essence, is the law that imports our basic civil rights as Americans into our capitalist, corporate economy.Where would we be without the great civil rights laws? We’d be in a country like Russia, where employers can sexually harass employees with impunity, fire someone when he turns 50, refuse to hire someone in a wheelchair, or punish someone for opposing discrimination at work.Employment law broadly encompasses the areas of sexual harassment, gender discrimination, sex discrimination, pregnancy discrimination, race discrimination, disability discrimination, religious discrimination, age discrimination, medical leave, FMLA leave, status-based negative stereotypes, and retaliation. The employment laws create important rights that can be enforced in court and provide remedies such as damages for lost wages and benefits, emotional distress, attorney fees and...

Unfairly Fired: What Qualifies as Wrongful Termination?

The Great Resignation is a term used to describe the mass resignation of employees from their jobs. This is the nearly 3% of the American workforce that has chosen to leave their employment on their own accord.But you may be surprised to learn that there were an additional 1.4 million individuals who were either let go or laid off from their employment through no fault of their own.Every single day, people are terminated unfairly from their jobs and they face many obstacles to getting what is owed them. Most don't even try.What is a wrongful termination? How does the law handle wrongful termination? Is it difficult to prove you've been terminated wrongfully?No matter the circumstances, nobody ever wants to imagine getting terminated from their job and if you find yourself in this position, there are many things you should know that can help you.  What Is Wrongful Termination?Wrongful termination is a legal term referring to when an employer terminates the employment of a worker for a wrongful cause. This termination is deemed unlawful, unjustified or in violation of public policy.What qualifies as wrongful termination? In the simplest terms, the employer fired an employee for a reason that's considered illegal. There are several...

Racism, American style

Slavery was brought to North America in the 1600s, where it took hold in colonies established by white Europeans who relied for money on the sale of tobacco and cotton. White plantation owners prospered on the backs of slave laborers. England's effort to assert control over the colonies by, among other things, encouraging slaves to revolt stoked the revolutionary spirit of Southern whites. Yet, these same would-be revolutionaries objected to language in Jefferson's first draft of the Declaration of Independence which faulted King George III for slavery. Such language implied that slavery was wrong and immoral, a proposition they summarily rejected. Slavery was therefore removed from the Declaration's list of grievances against the King. By the time of the Constitutional Convention, and even after the Articles of Confederation had proven so patently inadequate to the governance of the several States, slave-holding States declared their opposition to any constitutional provision that limited or interfered with, or even had the prospect of limiting or interfering with, their ownership of slaves. But for a sinful compromise with representatives from these southern States, the Constitution would not have been ratified. Over time, as more and more people recognized slavery's inherent incompatibility with the ideals...